What Happens to NaNoWriMo Novels?

A recent article in Publishers Weekly discussed why the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) program is a boon not only to writers, but to publishers as well. Now in its 18th year, NaNoWriMo is a non-profit organization whose mission is to “provide the structure, community, and encouragement to help people find their voices, achieve creative goals, and build new worlds—on and off the page.”

Writers who enter its contest each year commit to writing a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, from Nov 1 through 30. That is 1,667 words per day every day for 30 days. Some 350,000 writers joined the annual writing marathon this year. That means there will be a lot of first drafts of novels floating around on Dec, 1. So what happens to all of those novels?

A total of 449 traditionally published novels began as NaNoWriMo projects, wrote Jason Boog, who penned the article entitled, “NaNoWriMo is Big for Writers and It Helps Publishers, Too.” This number only includes those reported on the NaNoWriMo website, where authors can fill in a form stating their book was published. Some 80 of those books were published by Big Five publishers.

That figure is most likely conservative. And it doesn’t include self-published books that began as NaNoWriMo projects.

Publishers like the program because it encourages writing and writers’ communities, the article stated. “It’s been wonderful for the publishing industry,” said Laura Apperson, an editor at St. Martin’s Press. Three St. Martin’s novels began as NaNoWriMo projects: Lydia Netzer’s Shine Shine Shine, Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl, and Nora Zelevansky’s Semi-Charmed Life.”

Author Scott Reintgen, quoted in the article, obtained an agent for his NaNoWriMo novel. He had this to say: “You’re building muscles and you’re leveling up and you’re getting better with every single word you put on the page. That’s what being a writer is all about.”

Having “won” NaNoWriMo three times, my view is that it provides an intensive challenge to writers, forcing discipline and focus. It’s as much about the habits writers develop as it is about producing those 50,000 words. It’s serious business, like a boot camp for writers. And it creates and fosters writing communities. I joined the regional NaNo community in my region and it is a highly supportive and friendly group of writers.

My current work-in-progress, now at 106,000 words, started as a NaNoWriMo novel. It’s been through numerous rewrites and story changes since that time, bot NaNoWriMo was the impetus for its creation.

NaNoWriMo has its critics. Some say it encourages and re-enforces bad writing techniques in the quest for volume over quality. That may be the case, but only if writers don’t treat their work as a first draft in need of heavy revision.

I won’t be entering NaNoWriMo this year, but to all my colleagues who are, I will be thinking about you and rooting you on.

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