Book Review: 11/22/63, by Stephen King

Stephen King’s novel, 11/22/63, delves into a question that has haunted America for decades: how would the nation’s recent history have been different if President John F. Kennedy had not been assassinated? It also considers a deeper question: can we, or should we, mess with the past?

Jake Epping, the time traveling protagonist of 11/22/63, learns repeatedly the hard lesson that the past does not want to be changed. And Jake also learns that when somebody changes even minor events in the past there is a “butterfly effect,” meaning a small change can have far-reaching and disastrous impacts.

A recently divorced high school teacher living in a small town in Maine, Epping is handpicked by Al Templeton, owner of a local diner, to finish the job that he started. Templeton had passed through a portal located in the pantry of his diner back in time to September 9, 1958. After a number of trips back in time, Templeton decided he would try to prevent the assassination of JFK. Before he could do it, though, he was ravaged with cancer and was too sick to continue. So he returned to 2011 and he tapped Epping for the mission.

Intrigued by the challenge, Epping assumed a new identity as George Amberson and stepped back into time. After preventing a couple of local crimes, he set off for Florida and then for Dallas, where he assumed a double life. Amberson secured a job as a teacher in the friendly suburb of Jodie, Texas, but he rented dingy digs first in Fort Worth and then in Dallas, where he stalked Lee Harvey Oswald.

King’s research into Oswald’s life and marriage is impressive and he offers specific details of Oswald’s movements leading up to that fateful day in 1963. While the teaching job was merely a means to pass time and earn some money, Eppng/Amberson fell in love with school librarian Sadie Dunhill. His love for Sadie was so deep that he decided he would marry her after he stopped the assassination.

I believe King’s main point is that the world exists in a delicate balance, and the slightest change can upset that balance. Epping/Amberson experiences a moment of clarity during a charity dance in Jodie. “For a moment everything was clear, and when that happens you see the world is barely there at all. Don’t we all secretly know this? It’s a perfectly balanced mechanism of shouts and echoes pretending to be wheels and cogs, a dreamclock chiming beneath a mystery-glass we call life.”

This is really two parallel stories: the idyllic life Amberson led in the pleasant small-town world of Jodie and the ugly, violent city he witnessed in Dallas. King clearly has a liking for the 1950s and early 1960s, when life was simpler, but this story drives home the point that, for better or worse, we cannot go back to the past.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Book Review: 11/22/63, by Stephen King

  1. Interesting! King has an affinity for, and a skill with stories that play with time, as witnessed by The Shining and The Dark Tower series, among others. I’ll be picking this up soon– just finishing the newest Dark Tower book, which happens mid-series, but delves into Roland’s haunted past.

  2. Thanks for your comment. He does have a keen interest in the past. This was an interesting take on the JFK assassination and how it might have altered history, or not.

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